Surviving the Australian climate debate: read this and more in the new issue of MINE Australia

19 July 2019 (Last Updated July 19th, 2019 11:08)

In this issue: a look at the mining sector following the recent election, BHP the world’s most valuable mining brand, mining legend Sir Arvi Parbo’s life and more.

Surviving the Australian climate debate: read this and more in the new issue of MINE Australia

The new issue of MINE Australia is out now. Click here to read on any device.

Following the recent Australian elections, we take a look at how Scott Morrison’s re-election will influence the mining sector, and how the mining sector itself has become a divisive election issue in a world increasingly fighting the climate emergency. We also ask the new administration five questions on issues that will have an impact on the continued success of the industry.

Also in this issue, we ask BHP how it has become the world’s most valuable mining brand, and take a look at mining developments in Queensland, one of the best mining regions in the world where a controversial A$1bn coal mine has just been approved.

Further afield, India offers a huge opportunity for Australian miners, but one that is yet to be really taken advantage of. We take a look at the country’s potential and what is holding back progress.

Finally, we look back on the life of Sir Arvi Parbo, a titan of the Australian mining industry who passed away in May.

In this issue

Can mining survive the Australian climate change debate?

Australians have long made a living from what’s underground. The mining sector is a vital part of its economy, but it has its critics. Andrew Tunnicliffe speaks with Minerals Council of Australia’s CEO, Tania Constable, about the sector’s future potential, its action on climate change and the re-election of Scott Morrison and the Liberal-National coalition.

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Energy, environment and exports: key questions for the new Australian Government

Following the surprise victory of the Liberal-led Coalition in the ‘climate change election’ of May 2019, questions have been asked about what the new government’s impacts on the country’s mining industry will be, from cutting energy prices to awarding new permits. JP Casey considers five pressing questions for the government about the future of Australian mining.

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Brand new: how BHP became the world’s most valuable mining brand

The 2019 Brand Finance Mining, Iron & Steel 25 report has once again named BHP as the world’s most valuable mining brand with a value of $6bn and an AA strength rating. Julian Turner talks to Richard Haigh, Brand Finance’s head of mining practice, about why miners now care about branding.

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Olive Downs and the call for clarity in Queensland mining

With the Olive Downs open-cast mine almost certain to receive final approval in the coming months, Queensland’s mining future looks secure. Andrew Tunnicliffe speaks with Queensland Resource Council’s Ian Macfarlane about the importance of mining to the state and how regional and national policymakers should continue to recognise the crucial role it plays.

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India’s resources sector: a major opportunity for Australian miners?

Indian think tank the Observer Research Foundation (ORF) has published a brief advocating for a much closer cooperation between Australia and India to develop the latter country’s undeveloped mining sector. Julian Turner drills deeper in the company of ORF senior fellow Abhijit Mukhopadhyay.

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Sir Arvi Parbo: the life and career of an Aussie mining legend

In May the Australian mining sector mourned the passing of Sir Arvi Parbo, a titan of industry who started at the bottom as an Estonian immigrant after the Second World War and eventually sat as chairman of some of the country’s largest mining firms. What have been the major career milestones of a man described as “a lifelong pillar of Australian mining”? Chris Lo takes a look at the life of this mining legend.

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Video: what can we learn from the Queensland Rail accident?

Historically severe rains in Queensland derailed a stowed Glencore train in February, wrecking wagons, flooding tracks, and raising questions about what can be done to minimise the risks of disasters along the 1,000km-long Mount Isa line. JP Casey took a look at the accident.

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Next issue

Following the disaster in Brazil, tailings dams have come under close scrutiny around the world. Now in Australia, investors and the public alike are putting pressure on mining companies to be transparent about the safety of their tailings management, but will this lead to change?

As the number of people killed in mining accidents in Queensland continues to rise, the state is looking to extend its industrial manslaughter laws to include the industry. We take a look at the impact this could have on safety. Elsewhere, as droughts become increasingly common, mines are having to compete for water, but can anything be done?

Finally, we take a look at indigenous employment rates and how companies are improving them, the Junior Minerals Exploration Incentive fund, and sapphire mining.