Piedmont Lithium begins by-product study at lithium project in US

3 July 2018 (Last Updated July 3rd, 2018 12:26)

Piedmont Lithium has started a by-product study at the Piedmont lithium project, located in the Carolina Tin-Spodumene Belt in North Carolina, US, to assess potential quartz, feldspar and mica concentrate by-products.

Piedmont Lithium has started a by-product study at the Piedmont lithium project, located in the Carolina Tin-Spodumene Belt in North Carolina, US, to assess potential quartz, feldspar and mica concentrate by-products.

The company has selected CSA Global for the completion of mineral resource estimates for the by-products, which is slated to be completed by the second half of this year.

CSA Global recently completed the first mineral resource estimate for the Piedmont lithium project.

“Here is potential to deliver into the large, glass, ceramic, building products and technology businesses that are based in our region.”

Bench scale flotation tests and iron removal for quartz, feldspar and mica concentrates have been completed by North Carolina State University’s Minerals Research Lab, the results of which are pending.

Piedmont Lithium will provide data and samples from the bench scale test results to potential off-take partners to evaluate commercial potential.

The company is planning to release a scoping study for the project later this month.

Meanwhile, revenue potential from by-products are expected to be included in an update, which is anticipated to be available later this year after the definition of mineral resource estimates for each by-product.

Piedmont Lithium president and CEO Keith Phillips said: “While many spodumene pegmatites include quartz, feldspar and mica mineralisation, most are located too remotely to economically serve the important markets for these products.

“Given our location in the industrial heartland of the USA, there is potential to deliver into the large glass, ceramic, building products and technology businesses that are based in our region and have great need for these minerals.

“The historic Hallman-Beam mine derived substantial revenue from by-products, and if we are able to do the same it will have a positive impact on our production costs.”