Three Queensland scientists secure funding to conduct research on mining

20 April 2016 (Last Updated April 20th, 2016 18:30)

Three scientists in Queensland, Australia, have secured funding from the state government to conduct research in a bid to overcome mining industry challenges.

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Three scientists in Queensland, Australia, have secured funding from the state government to conduct research in a bid to overcome mining industry challenges.

Minister for Innovation, Science and the Digital Economy, Leeanne Enoch, said that the $540,000 research funding was part of more than $10m awarded under the Queensland Government's first round of Advance Queensland Research Fellowship and PhD Scholarship programmes.

"Queensland is recognised internationally for its research in mining and engineering and we are home to many brilliant scientists, who work in a number of institutions and joint ventures, and are aiming to develop new technologies and bring them to commercial success.

"These Advance Queensland Research Fellowships will assist the mining industry with addressing current challenges and developing innovative solutions to help Queensland remain internationally competitive."

The three scientists will receive $180,000 for a period of three years, and work with Queensland research institutions and industry organisations to ensure the research is translated into real practical application.

Advance Queensland Research Fellowship recipients to undertake the research are Dr Hong Peng, Dr Pradeep Shukla from the University of Queensland's School of Chemical Engineering and Dr Sergio-Andres Galindo-Torres from the University of Queensland's School of Civil Engineering,

Peng will partner with Rio Tinto through the University of Queensland Rio Tinto Bauxite and Alumina Technology Centre, to improve the state's bauxite mineral reserves with respect to high silica bauxite.

In partnership with Synergen Met, Shukla will lead a team to develop a new technology for producing cyanide both on-site and on-demand.

"While the mining sector is currently facing global challenges, it remains vital to our economy."

Galindo-Torres, in partnership with Golder Associates, aims to introduce new modelling and visualisation technologies for their use in several areas related to the mining and energy sectors.

The areas include coal seam gas extraction and the controversial hydraulic fracturing treatment.

Minister for natural resources and mines, Anthony Lynham, said that the research funding investment was a welcome boost for the industry.

"While the mining sector is currently facing global challenges, it remains vital to our economy."


Image: The three scientists will receive $180,000 for three years and work with Queensland research institutions on mining innovation. Photo: courtesy of duron123/FreeDigitalPhotos.net.