Strongbow Exploration completes water treatment trials at South Crofty tin project in UK

2 April 2017 (Last Updated April 2nd, 2017 18:30)

Strongbow Exploration has successfully completed water treatment trials at its South Crofty tin project in Cornwall, UK.

Strongbow Exploration has successfully completed water treatment trials at its South Crofty tin project in Cornwall, UK.

Currently, the company is planning to submit an application to the UK Environment Agency (EA) to secure a main waste permit.

Strongbow Exploration has hired a global engineering and project management consultancy WS Atkins to submit an application to EA for mine waste permit along with water discharge consent.

The company expects to submit this application within one month and secure an approval before the end of the third calendar quarter this year.

Strongbow Exploration president and CEO Richard Williams said: "This is an important step forward as Strongbow works to bring the South Crofty mine back into operation.

"The South Crofty team worked closely with the UK Environment Agency throughout the process and I am very pleased that we were able to develop a system to treat the mine water, which met their very high standards.

"This is an important step forward as Strongbow works to bring the South Crofty mine back into operation."

"We have resounding local support in Cornwall and I look forward to updating shareholders and the local community during the summer."

Following receipt of the mine waste permit and water discharge consent, the South Crofty project will be fully permitted.

After approval, the company will receive a mining licence that is valid up to 2071. It will secure the planning permission to build new surface process facilities.

Water treatment trials were conducted by Siltbuster Process Solutions, a UK mine water treatment company.

Siltbuster completed the trials by using its high-density sludge process and a temporary water treatment plant was constructed for the trial period at the mine site.

The trials were necessary to demonstrate that contaminated mine water could be treated, and dissolved metals and suspended solids could be procured before mine water is discharged into the Red River.