Coast and Country objects to Adani’s Carmichael mine project in Queensland

30 March 2015 (Last Updated March 30th, 2015 18:30)

Environmental group Coast and Country has objected to Indian mining company Adani Group's A$16.5bn ($12.5bn) Carmichael Coal mine project in the Galilee Basin in central Queensland.

GreatBarrierReef

Environmental group Coast and Country has objected to Indian mining company Adani Group's A$16.5bn ($12.5bn) Carmichael Coal mine project in the Galilee Basin in central Queensland.

The Australian environmental lobby took the company to the Land Court of Queensland claiming that the open cut and underground coal mine project would endanger biodiversity in the region.

Covering 45,000ha, the proposed mine is claimed to be one of the largest in the world and will use a new 300km railway line to transfer up to 60 million tonnes of coal a year to overseas markets.

The group further said that Adani's mine would endanger the climate, groundwater, the Great Barrier Reef and the endangered black-throated finch.

Coast and Country's Derec Davies was reported by media sources as saying that the mine would release more carbon pollution and warm the world.

Adani defended its plans, arguing that the mine would create thousands of jobs while injecting millions of dollars into Queensland's economy.

"The mine would release more carbon pollution and warm the world."

The Brisbane court has heard opening submissions from all parties and will make a recommendation to the Queensland Government upon receiving all of the evidence.

Mining for the proposed thermal coal mine is planned to be by both open cut and underground methods.

Carmichael Coal mine is expected to operate for around 90 years and to extract four billion tonnes of coal over its mine life.

On 8 May 2014, the project secured approval from Queensland's Coordinator-General and then from the federal Minister for Environment, Greg Hunt, on 29 July 2014.


Image: Coast and Country claims that Adani's mine will endanger the Great Barrier Reef. Photo: courtesy of NASA.