MINE digital magazine: Issue 3

20 September 2012 (Last Updated September 20th, 2012 10:28)

In this issue: We take a look at Canada’s Ring of Fire, new technology used to help meet the demand for coal, Mozambique’s future in the coal industry and much more.

MINE digital magazine: Issue 3

MINE | Issue 3 | September 2012

Whether it is reports of rare earth minerals in Afghanistan, copper in Zambia, coal in Ukraine or gold in Greenland, there are still immense reserves lying hidden in every corner of the globe. In the next issue we scan the planet to profile the most exciting untapped mineral deposits of each region.

As global demand for coal is expected to soar over the next 20 years, we explore new extraction technologies that will help the mining industry to meet that need, tapping both existing and less conventional sources. We also find out how intelligent visualisation software can increase productivity by revolutionising routine analysis techniques, and take a look at Planetary Resources' ambitious quest to mine asteroids.

Moreover, we explore the environmental and infrastructure challenges surrounding Canada's Ring of Fire, a proposed development to mine a massive chromite deposit in Ontario.

Click here to read your free copy.

In this issue

Hidden Treasures
There are still immense reserves lying hidden in every corner of the globe. We scan the planet to profile the most exciting untapped mineral deposits of each region.
Read the full article.

Africa's New Coal Giant
Mozambique is poised to become one of the largest exporters of coal in the world. We review the market in the region and identifies key drivers.
Read the full article.

In Search of Coal
Coal is one of the cheapest and most reliable sources of energy, and as demand soars new technology will be crucial. With global demand for coal widely expected to rise over the next 20 years, we find out how a range of new technologies will help the coal mining industry meet that need - from both existing and less conventional sources.
Read the full article.

The Ring of Fire
A massive chromite deposit located in Canada's 'ring-of-fire' could carry the steel industry for a century. The massive infrastructure project needed to the tap this resource however makes finding harmony between the local First Nation people and other relevant role players is a difficult prospect.
Read the full article.

Sampling Rocks in Hard Places
Intelligent visualisation and analysis software can increase productivity by revolutionising routine analysis techniques. MINE asks Jérôme Hummel, application engineer and mining specialist at VSG, about the value of visualisation and analysis, and about new options unveiled within the seventh version of the company's Avizo Fire 3D visualisation software.
Read the full article.

The Age of Asteroid Mining
Planetary Resources is embarking on a quest to mine asteroids but, other firms have attempted to explore space for precious reserves before, without gaining a return on investment. What makes this project any different?
Read the full article.

Olympic Dam Copper-Uranium Mine
Olympic Dam is a huge mining centre located in South Australia and is home to a major oxide copper gold deposit.
Read the full article.

Olympic Dam Delay: The Industry Reacts
Global miner BHP Billiton has announced that it will delay its planned $20bn Olympic Dam expansion. As company profits fall for the first time in three years, mining-technology.com asks the experts if this could spell an end to the mining boom in Australia.
Read the full article.

Etango Uranium Project
The Etango uranium project, operated by Bannerman Mining Resources, is one of the largest undeveloped uranium mines in the world.
Read the full article.

Next issue preview

With the Earth's remaining mineral deposits becoming scarce, the right sampling tools are essential. In the next issue we round up some of the industry's most innovative technologies for finding deposits and judging their viability. We also find out why the keen noses of sniffer dogs are proving so successful at locating ore that even mining giants are taking notice.

As demand for copper grows and the number of high-grade mining sites quickly falls, we find out why mineral-munching microbes could be an unconventional but promising technique for metal mining in the future.

We also investigate why the deadly blast at Xiaojiawan mine in China has brought safety management back into the spotlight, find out how better security is opening up Latin America's resources to international companies, and ask why a shortage of skills could spell the end for Australia's mining boom.

Digital Magazine FAQ

The digital magazine is viewable on any computer with Flash Player installed. It is also viewable on mobile devices, iPhones and iPads, although some features and videos may be disabled.

Read the latest issue.

View the archive of back issues.

Sign up for your free subscription.