Striking workers at Impala’s Marula mine likely to resume work

7 July 2014 (Last Updated July 7th, 2014 18:30)

More than 2,000 wildcat strikers at South Africa's Marula mine, which is owned by Impala Platinum, are expected to return to work today.

More than 2,000 wildcat strikers at South Africa's Marula mine, which is owned by Impala Platinum, are expected to return to work today.

Representatives of the striking employees held discussions with the company and promised to resume work, reported The Wall Street Journal.

Impala spokesman Johan Theron said: "They agreed in principle to raise the issues through formal channels. There were a whole bunch of things that they're not happy with."

"Our leaders there have been told by unknown people to vacate their offices in 48 hours or they will be killed."

The wildcat strike started on Friday, when workers of the mine raised issues ranging from union representation to wages.

The incident follows the recently ended five-month strike for a wage rise in South Africa. Around 70,000 platinum workers participated in the protest, led by the Association of Mineworkers and Construction Union (AMCU).

The Marula Mine is unionised by the National Union of Mineworkers (NUM), which was not part of the five-month strike.

However, the NUM was quoted by The Wall Street Journal as saying that it was not behind the Marula strike and accused its rival union, the AMCU, of starting the action at the mine.

Impala said it suspects that the striking miners will demand a similar offer to that awarded to workers in the AMCU.

Meanwhile, tensions in the area continue to build as NUM was quoted by Reuters as saying: "A workers' committee has been set-up there which is leading the strike. Our leaders there have been told by unknown people to vacate their offices in 48 hours or they will be killed."

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