Australian Greens urge Rex Minerals to reveal uranium deposit information

19 October 2014 (Last Updated October 19th, 2014 18:30)

Australian green political party The Greens has demanded Rex Minerals to release documents related to uranium deposits at its open pit copper mine in York Peninsula.

Australian green political party The Greens has demanded Rex Minerals to release documents related to uranium deposits at its open pit copper mine in York Peninsula.

Earlier this year, the South Australian Government had approved the mine despite concerned raised by the community about the potential impact of mining on the region's prime farmland, reported ABC.

The YP Landholders Group, which was established in 2010 against Rex Minerals' mining activity in the region, had previously told the news agency that around three million kg of dust produced by Rex Minerals' Hillside copper, gold and ore mine each year could contain radioactive uranium and its decay products.

"Around three million kg of dust produced by Rex Minerals' Hillside copper, gold and ore mine each year could contain radioactive uranium." 

The South Australian Government approved the open pit mining near Ardrossan, and Rex Minerals deemed some mining lease proposal documents as confidential and refused to publish them.

The mine is expected to extract two million tonnes of copper, 1.7 million ounces of gold and 44 million tonnes of iron ore over the mine's life of 15 years.

However, The Greens leader Mark Parnell alleges that the company is hiding information of appendices 36 and 37 related to uranium.

Dismissing the claims, Rex Minerals managing director Steve Olsen stated that the issue of uranium onsite had been reviewed by experts and regulators.

Parnell told the news agency: "If the company says 'nothing to worry about', then they should have nothing to worry about releasing the documents that explain exactly where the radioactive hotspots are.

"They need to come clean with the local community, otherwise the community is quite within their rights to be suspicious and to be worried about what's to come if this mine goes ahead."

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