Torrential rain disrupts rail shipments from Peruvian mines


Torrential rain has disrupted transportation of minerals by train from Peru's central mining region to the Pacific Coast.

Rains have brought the mining industry to a standstill, according to a Reuters report.

Peruvian Vice-President and Minister of Transport Martin Vizcarra said that restoring the train service may take more than 15 days.

Vizcarra told the local radio station that at least 1km of rail line that serves as the link to the mining location, was destroyed due to floods from the Rimac river in the outskirts of Lima.

The government is currently discussing finding alternative feasible routes with mining companies.

"Heavy rainfall has caused severe floods in the country, leading to death of around 70 people and displacing thousands of others."

Heavy rainfall has caused severe floods in the country, leading to death of around 70 people and displacing thousands of others.

The central part of Peru is a prominent mining location. According to National Society of Mining, Petroleum and Energy (SNMPE), around one-fifth of Peru’s total mineral production comes from this location.

Peru is the second-largest copper producer, third-largest zinc and silver producer in the world. It is also the sixth-largest gold producer in the world.

An SNMPE spokesman said to the news agency that the warehouses at Peru's El Callao port had enough stock to fulfil mining companies' commitments for up to 30 days.

Torrential rainfall began a week ago due to Coastal El Nino.