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UK mining museum appeals for coal mining memorial

7 December 2012

National Coal Mining Museum for England

The National Coal Mining Museum in the UK has launched an appeal to set up a memorial garden at the museum's Hope Pit in West Yorkshire as a tribute to individuals who died in mining accidents.

Hope Pit is located at Caphouse Colliery, the former Overton Colliery near Wakefield, where the museum is currently situated.

Scheduled to open in July 2014, the memorial will be a place to contemplate and reflect.

Museum representative Katherine Morley told the BBC, "We exist to keep coal mining alive for future generations. Working in it is a very dangerous activity."

Barnsley Central Labour MP Dan Jarvis spoke at the appeal launch, saying, "In Yorkshire, mining has been the fibre that has linked families, created friendships and is what many of our communities were built on."

The Oaks explosion remains the worst mining accident in England's history, claiming 388 lives on 12 December 1866 near Barnsley in Yorkshire.

The Hulton Colliery explosion at Westhoughton, Lancashire, in 1910 killed 344 miners and an explosion in 1878, at the Wood Pit, Haydock, Lancashire, killed over 200 workers.


Image: National Coal Mining Museum for England plans to create a memorial for coal miners. Photo: J3Mrs.